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roc_abilly

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Te following is relevant to our life in this country. As it constituted a warning from way back about what would inevitably happen here if we kept going the way we were going. And now we are seeing the start of it, just as was foreseeable from a long time ago.

 

DS86DS

Member
Administrator
A documentary on the culture of overwork in Japan.



While Japan seems like a nice country to visit or live in, working there must be an absolute nightmare. Some of them put in an extra 100 hours a month without any overtime pay for instance.

Japanese workplaces also seem to be excessively strict and punctual. I don't think we Irish as a people might be suited to such an environment. We are possibly too laid back, on top of which we are a people who don't really like being told what to do. Rigid Japanese conformity would certainly be a culture shock I'd imagine.
 
I keep on meaning to post a video of a beef lunch (being cooked) as the customers wait in a Toyko restaurant.. But I couldn't find it. There's lots of them but the one I remember I can't find.
 

roc_abilly

Member
Jap bike. Fastest bike you can pop down to your local dealer and drive it on the road. Fuckin' ridiculous power in this yoke. Awesome.

 
Picked this up in Lidl for only €2.70 and would definitely recommend.

Ha.. That stuff's decent enough but I'd hardly call it cheap. What's that, 3 pieces? Hardly a mealful.

I used to buy it but you're talking 2-3 times that price for a proper lunch. It's quite nice sushi fare I suppose, hardly going to blow the mind off a Jap but tasty all the same. Usually comes with.. I've gone completely blank on the name, begins with 'w' I think, quite like (Japanese) Coleman's mustard, except green :) And the little plastic container of soy sauce (about half as much as you'd want)
 

DS86DS

Member
Administrator
Jap bike. Fastest bike you can pop down to your local dealer and drive it on the road. Fuckin' ridiculous power in this yoke. Awesome.



The Japanese are great at technology and engineering.

Ha.. That stuff's decent enough but I'd hardly call it cheap. What's that, 3 pieces? Hardly a mealful.

I used to buy it but you're talking 2-3 times that price for a proper lunch. It's quite nice sushi fare I suppose, hardly going to blow the mind off a Jap but tasty all the same. Usually comes with.. I've gone completely blank on the name, begins with 'w' I think, quite like (Japanese) Coleman's mustard, except green :) And the little plastic container of soy sauce (about half as much as you'd want)

It has five pieces in total, including sauce...two tuna sushi, two cucumber sushi and one salmon sushi.
 

Mowl

Member
Ha.. That stuff's decent enough but I'd hardly call it cheap. What's that, 3 pieces? Hardly a mealful.

I used to buy it but you're talking 2-3 times that price for a proper lunch. It's quite nice sushi fare I suppose, hardly going to blow the mind off a Jap but tasty all the same. Usually comes with.. I've gone completely blank on the name, begins with 'w' I think, quite like (Japanese) Coleman's mustard, except green :) And the little plastic container of soy sauce (about half as much as you'd want)

Wasabi, super hot and requires a decent Japanese beer to tame it.

It has five pieces in total, including sauce...two tuna sushi, two cucumber sushi and one salmon sushi.

Our local supermarket has a sushi bar within the store, it's a separate self-service unit but you pay for your choices at the regular cashier point.



You select your fresh sushi onto a tray and it's sold by weight. Each piece of sushi is a standard size/weight, so it doesn't matter which pieces you prefer, it'll all cost around the same. The sauces (soy and wasabi) are complimentary. But what I like is the samples counter: they offer free tastings all day every day and I always grab a few. Then grab a rake of free soy and wasabi sachets and stock them up.

Upstairs is another two sushi bars, right next to each other who share a dining area. This will give you an idea of how popular sushi is with the Finns. The pricing is easily affordable in the sit-down outlets and they sell off the not-so-fresh pieces in bulk at half the price.

Oh that's quite good (value).. Does it have the green mustard?

You don't get free sauces with your sushi in Ireland?

Try Yamamori on Sth Great George's Street: Derek Ryan's place, I used to be his interior decorator (white-washing the walls four times a year, an overnight job) and maintenance man. He's in and out of Japan all the time looking for new ways to serve the customer base.

Great food, great service, and well affordable.

Tell him Mowl sent you.

I don't think it does? You might have to buy separately.

Pay? For sauces?

Jaze, fucking Ireland.
 
Wasabi, super hot and requires a decent Japanese beer to tame it.
That's the one

Our local supermarket has a sushi bar within the store, it's a separate self-service unit but you pay for your choices at the regular cashier point.



You select your fresh sushi onto a tray and it's sold by weight. Each piece of sushi is a standard size/weight, so it doesn't matter which pieces you prefer, it'll all cost around the same. The sauces (soy and wasabi) are complimentary. But what I like is the samples counter: they offer free tastings all day every day and I always grab a few. Then grab a rake of free soy and wasabi sachets and stock them up.

Upstairs is another two sushi bars, right next to each other who share a dining area. This will give you an idea of how popular sushi is with the Finns. The pricing is easily affordable in the sit-down outlets and they sell off the not-so-fresh pieces in bulk at half the price.
You don't get free sauces with your sushi in Ireland?
These are little plastic trays of sushi you buy in shops, Oishi or whatever it's called, you don't get to pick and choose (there are various different (prepackaged) trays) and the sauces are in the box.

Try Yamamori on Sth Great George's Street: Derek Ryan's place, I used to be his interior decorator (white-washing the walls four times a year, an overnight job) and maintenance man. He's in and out of Japan all the time looking for new ways to serve the customer base.

Great food, great service, and well affordable.

Tell him Mowl sent you.
It's been a while since I've been in Yamamori. If I recall every table had one of these (maybe they had a sponsorship deal :)) -

kikkoman-soya-red-150.jpg
 

Mowl

Member
That's the one

It's rather bitter in the aftertaste though, it stays on the palate longer than the fish/sushi itself.

Maybe that's why beer goes better with sushi than wine?

For me at least.

These are little plastic trays of sushi you buy in shops, Oishi or whatever it's called, you don't get to pick and choose (there are various different (prepackaged) trays) and the sauces are in the box.

Ah, but the local sushi bar allows you to choose your own pieces; you use a plastic pick-up device and fill the plastic tray (there are a few sizes of tray and they aren't part of the price: you select the tray size and the tray weight is discounted from the total) and put a clear plastic lid over it. I dislike the plastic element: disposable wood trays along with the disposable wooden chopsticks would be far better.

It's been a while since I've been in Yamamori.

I was actually at the official opening of Yamamori, it was another bloke who started the franchise and Derek was a staff member: but he later bought out the guy who opened the place and from there expanded into several different branches along Sth Gt George's Street and across the Ha'penny Bridge on Lower Ormond Quay.

I think he's opened even more locations out into the shopping centres in the suburbs.

He was a great guy to work for, left to me alone to do things my own way and paid extremely well for overnight work repainting all of the walls in white because the kitchen fumes coated the walls in a light but greasy film. I used eighteen inch rollers, usually hired an assistant, and the quarterly repainting took around three full night from business end to staff arrival next morning.

He sold Asahi Super Dry and Sapporo Premium from the fridge, but always left a tray for me for breaks during the night. I'd eat supper there too, on the house. In fact, everything was on the house, can't recall ever paying for food or drinks.

One thing I would say though: the walk-in fridge in the kitchen had a layer of grease about seven inches thick sitting on top of it. I refused to deal with it, it was utterly vile. he had to get a company in to pressure spray it off, in massive congealed lumps that they shoveled into black bags and dumped.

Fucking rotten.

But that said, the rest of the kitchen was spotless, and I worked for several city restaurant owners back then that were far worse. But that's the gig: when you work in restaurants as a contractor, you get to see what it's really like. It's another reason I'd pick a fish and chip shop for supper and who cook the food in front of me than use any of the restaurants I worked in.

If I recall every table had one of these (maybe they had a sponsorship deal :)) -

kikkoman-soya-red-150.jpg

Kikkoman is fairly standard though. But I'd imagine he had an angle with his supplier. Derek's a no nonsense working class man, so airs or graces about him. He has the inner city accent and attitude, up for a laugh, loves his live music (he came to hear bands I played in all over town) and when I suggested a jazz trio in the corner up the rear area on the right, he tried it and it worked, so he kept it going for years.

Walton's music shop next door own the floor above the restaurant, and around the time I quit doing the re-decoration, it was because the dropped-roof cavity in the ceiling was caving in from from the dance and gym classes above. He had to get the entire roof replaced. It shut him down for months, but he had the other branches.

One time I did the black matt exterior in late autumn and was up on the ladder painting away; then a breeze took a drop of paint and carried it down the street and it landed on some nasty woman's coat lapel. She was several meters away and it certainly wasn't anything but an act of random chance. But I had to buy her a new coat, it cost half the fees.

Plus, the pavement is so thin at Yamamori's front door the ladder was at an angle of around eighty degrees. Then there was a bus stop right there at the door for years as well. He had that moved. The exterior was always a far more dangerous job, but it had to be done: the walls were manky from the rain, the traffic splashing at it, the slush, the window cleaner bloke, and knacker bastards spitting on the glass (for whatever reason) when passing by.

Four times a year, every year for a decade or so.

Can't do that kind of work anymore though.
 
It's rather bitter in the aftertaste though, it stays on the palate longer than the fish/sushi itself.

Maybe that's why beer goes better with sushi than wine?

For me at least.
Do the Japs even drink wine? :)

Ah, but the local sushi bar allows you to choose your own pieces; you use a plastic pick-up device and fill the plastic tray (there are a few sizes of tray and they aren't part of the price: you select the tray size and the tray weight is discounted from the total) and put a clear plastic lid over it. I dislike the plastic element: disposable wood trays along with the disposable wooden chopsticks would be far better.
Yeah, I suppose the packaging is meant to mimic that. But it's all prepackaged gear that you buy in shops - Spars, Centras, supermarkets etc. and I think it's always the same brand, Oishii, the pre-packaged sushi mafia of Ireland :)

Like I said, there's no choice as such and although every tray has a bottle of soy sauce (in David's picture it's on the right, top of it looks a bit like a fish tail and yes, I do think it's an overuse of plastic) you probably need to spend a bit more to get the wasabi..

5391518960098_3.JPG


And what's that to the left of it, I've forgotten what that's called too and that goes well on the palate (complements the wasabi).

I was actually at the official opening of Yamamori, it was another bloke who started the franchise and Derek was a staff member: but he later bought out the guy who opened the place and from there expanded into several different branches along Sth Gt George's Street and across the Ha'penny Bridge on Lower Ormond Quay.

I think he's opened even more locations out into the shopping centres in the suburbs.

He was a great guy to work for, left to me alone to do things my own way and paid extremely well for overnight work repainting all of the walls in white because the kitchen fumes coated the walls in a light but greasy film. I used eighteen inch rollers, usually hired an assistant, and the quarterly repainting took around three full night from business end to staff arrival next morning.

He sold Asahi Super Dry and Sapporo Premium from the fridge, but always left a tray for me for breaks during the night. I'd eat supper there too, on the house. In fact, everything was on the house, can't recall ever paying for food or drinks.

One thing I would say though: the walk-in fridge in the kitchen had a layer of grease about seven inches thick sitting on top of it. I refused to deal with it, it was utterly vile. he had to get a company in to pressure spray it off, in massive congealed lumps that they shoveled into black bags and dumped.

Fucking rotten.

But that said, the rest of the kitchen was spotless, and I worked for several city restaurant owners back then that were far worse. But that's the gig: when you work in restaurants as a contractor, you get to see what it's really like. It's another reason I'd pick a fish and chip shop for supper and who cook the food in front of me than use any of the restaurants I worked in.
Kikkoman is fairly standard though.
Also not the cheapest

But I'd imagine he had an angle with his supplier.
Quite possibly

Derek's a no nonsense working class man, so airs or graces about him. He has the inner city accent and attitude, up for a laugh, loves his live music (he came to hear bands I played in all over town) and when I suggested a jazz trio in the corner up the rear area on the right, he tried it and it worked, so he kept it going for years.

Walton's music shop next door own the floor above the restaurant, and around the time I quit doing the re-decoration, it was because the dropped-roof cavity in the ceiling was caving in from from the dance and gym classes above. He had to get the entire roof replaced. It shut him down for months, but he had the other branches.

One time I did the black matt exterior in late autumn and was up on the ladder painting away; then a breeze took a drop of paint and carried it down the street and it landed on some nasty woman's coat lapel. She was several meters away and it certainly wasn't anything but an act of random chance. But I had to buy her a new coat, it cost half the fees.

Plus, the pavement is so thin at Yamamori's front door the ladder was at an angle of around eighty degrees. Then there was a bus stop right there at the door for years as well. He had that moved. The exterior was always a far more dangerous job, but it had to be done: the walls were manky from the rain, the traffic splashing at it, the slush, the window cleaner bloke, and knacker bastards spitting on the glass (for whatever reason) when passing by.

Four times a year, every year for a decade or so.

Can't do that kind of work anymore though.
Ain't none of us getting any younger Mowl.
 

Mowl

Member
Do the Japs even drink wine? :)

As I recall, Yoko, the Japanese lady I lived with in Dublin, always fell apart laughing at the mention of Cabernet Sauvignon. She had beer with her sushi so I followed suit. The Jap beers are quite dry, so they compliment the fish rather well, to my taste anyway.

Yeah, I suppose the packaging is meant to mimic that. But it's all prepackaged gear that you buy in shops - Spars, Centras, supermarkets etc. and I think it's always the same brand, Oishii, the pre-packaged sushi mafia of Ireland :)

Sushi Mafia: I'm stealing that name for my next party band!

Like I said, there's no choice as such and although every tray has a bottle of soy sauce (in David's picture it's on the right, top of it looks a bit like a fish tail and yes, I do think it's an overuse of plastic) you probably need to spend a bit more to get the wasabi..

5391518960098_3.JPG

I wouldn't be up for a pre-packed version of sushi - I'd go fresh every time. Bad raw fish can fuck you up even worse than bad meat. The pre-packed shit's always kind of bland.

And what's that to the left of it, I've forgotten what that's called too and that goes well on the palate (complements the wasabi).

Looks like diced ginger in vinegar?

Also not the cheapest

Nothing at all is these days.

Quite possibly

Dealers and suppliers make deals - if you're buying in bulk, there's always freebies added.

Ain't none of us getting any younger Mowl.

You got that right.
 
As I recall, Yoko, the Japanese lady I lived with in Dublin, always fell apart laughing at the mention of Cabernet Sauvignon. She had beer with her sushi so I followed suit. The Jap beers are quite dry, so they compliment the fish rather well, to my taste anyway.



Sushi Mafia: I'm stealing that name for my next party band!
I wouldn't be up for a pre-packed version of sushi - I'd go fresh every time. Bad raw fish can fuck you up even worse than bad meat. The pre-packed shit's always kind of bland.
There isn't any raw fish in it, wouldn't be at all concerned about eating it (within the use by date). I'd say it's a bit blander alright (if that's a word).

Looks like diced ginger in vinegar?
Yeah, yeah I think it's pickled ginger, it's quite nice, sort of sweet.

Nothing at all is these days.



Dealers and suppliers make deals - if you're buying in bulk, there's always freebies added.
Well you can buy soy sauce for half the price of Kikkoman in the supermarket. So the cheaper option would be an unlabeled decanter with that, or maybe that's what he's filling the Kikkoman bottles with :)

You got that right.
I usually am :)

Btw, I was reading about wasabi which I compared to Colman's mustard which I really like (even if I spelt the name wrong) and apparently wasabi (the real deal) is not supposed to be hot.. What did Yoko think? 🤔
 

Mowl

Member
What did Yoko think? 🤔


She had all her favourite (packaged) dry foods and customs-acceptable jars of all sorts of weird stuff sent over, but like myself she wasn't a big eater. One meal a day, mostly. At supper time.

Very slim at the hips and very dainty, those Geisha eyes and body language.

Naturally graceful, the Japanese ladies.

But funnily enough she did develop a taste for fish and chips from Burdock's, which was around the corner from her place on Castle Street. We'd eat from there at the weekend. Rest of the time she did nice things with a wok and local ingredients, then added her Japanese tricks to give it a home flavour. Some stuff was great, other dishes just pain weird, but never boring. Or bland.

Colman's mustard: I used to bring a couple of jars from Dublin when I got home but nowadays they even sell the powder version up here, which I prefer: I can boost it a bit by using white wine for the paste, then a little red chili oil/essence and mix it up. Can't eat a prime steak without Colman's.

That'd be criminal - an offence to all decent cud-chewing bovines.

Even Val's.
 

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